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April 9, 2018

Public consultation on protecting our oceans

On April 6, 2018, Fisheries and Oceans Canada announced the formation of a National Advisory Panel to make recommendations on Canada’s Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

MPAs are legally protected and managed areas of the ocean that are set aside for long-term conservation. Despite this simple definition, marine protection can take several different forms, all of which have benefits and drawbacks. Creating standards for marine protection is a primary goal of the National Advisory Panel. Continue reading

February 20, 2018

Networks – planning for marine protected area success

According to Fisheries and Oceans Canada, a Marine Protected Area (MPA) is, “part of the ocean that is legally protected and managed to achieve long-term conservation of nature.”

MPAs may be created to preserve the health of the marine environment, support coastal communities or protect important Canadian cultural sites. While all MPAs share a similar purpose, each MPA is regulated on an individual basis according to the resources, industries and ecosystem considerations in that specific MPA. Continue reading

February 19, 2018

The problems with the new Canadian Navigable Waters Act

The Canadian government recently introduced Bill C-69, claiming that this legislation delivers on a campaign promise to “restore lost protections, and incorporate more modern safeguards” in several environmental statutes. Continue reading

February 8, 2018

An international plastics treaty could avert a “Silent Spring” for our seas

Global problems – like our plastic-choked seas – need global solutions.

It was welcome news when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Canada will use its year-long G7 presidency to turn the global spotlight on ocean plastics and pollution.

Read more on wcel.org

February 6, 2018

New Fisheries Act Restores Lost Protections and Adds Modern Safeguards

Fisheries Act amendments show promise, but true test will be in implementation

Today, the Government of Canada tabled a new Fisheries Act, with the goal of upgrading the Act to restoring protections that were lost as part of the 2012 Omnibus budget Bill as well as add modern safeguards. The Fisheries Act hasn’t seen tangible improvement since it was created in 1868 and has not included a purpose section since amendments were made in 1996.

Read more on EcologyAction.ca

February 1, 2018

Emergency order aims to protect resident orcas

Canada is losing a lot of its wildlife. The World Wildlife Fund’s 2017 Living Planet Report Canada found half the monitored mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian and fish species declined from 1970 to 2014. Threatened and endangered species continue to disappear despite federal legislation designed to protect them and help their populations recover. What’s going wrong?

Read More at davidsuzuki.org

January 25, 2018

Plankton over plastic: Citizen support for strong laws to reduce ocean plastics

Plastics permeate all aspects of our daily lives. Now plastic pollution plagues the planet. Marine plastic debris is pervasive, persistent, and has grave consequences for marine ecosystems.

Read more on wcel.org

January 23, 2018

East China Sea supertanker disaster shows dangers of carrying toxic substances in open water

It could have been a scene from a Hollywood disaster movie: billowing black smoke, a growing oil slick 16 kilometres long and the remnants of a half-sunken super oil tanker in the middle of one of the world’s busiest waterways. But this was real life.

Read more at davidsuzuki.org

December 21, 2017

New Fisheries Closures Mark Progress in Canada’s Ocean Protection Agenda

Today, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans announced seven new fisheries closures stretching from the Newfoundland Shelf all the way to the Eastern Arctic and totaling 145,598 km squared. All bottom fishing activity, including traps, longlines, gillnets and bottom trawls will be prohibited. These measures protect just over 2.5% of Canada’s ocean habitat and bring us closer to reaching our international commitment of 10% by 2020.

Read more on EcologyAction.ca

December 20, 2017

BC’s Glass Sponge Reefs added to Canada’s Tentative List for World Heritage Sites

The holidays are looking brighter this year with the announcement that British Columbia’s Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound glass sponge reefs are being added to Canada’s tentative list for World Heritage Sites.

Read more at cpaws.org

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